All121. 2012 American Community Survey Information. Median age, median income, median rent, percent Black or African American, percent Asian, percent foreign born, percent Hispanic or Latino, percent senior citizens, percent vacant residential units, percent White, percent under 18, median commute via public transit.

This entry marks the second in a series of blog posts on research conducted for The Other New York, SITU’s contribution to the MoMA exhibition Uneven Growth. In the prior post we focused on a largely hidden and unaccounted for component of the housing crisis in New York City. Here, we look into the metrics that can shed some light on the household composition of illegally converted dwellings – spaces that are by definition hard to document. Working in collaboration with Citizens Housing and Planning Council and using their Making Room Household Model, SITU visualized data from the American Community Survey with respect to housing demographics. This study was instrumental in identifying neighborhoods that would become the focus of our design strategy and proposal for the Uneven Growth exhibition.

Politicians and researchers have argued that in the most recent decennial census, conducted in 2010, New York City’s population was undercounted by upwards of 50,000 and perhaps as high as 400,000 people.  Much of the discrepancy is believed to have occurred in communities within the boroughs of Queens and Brooklyn – vibrant neighborhoods such as Astoria and Jackson Heights, Bay Ridge and Bensonhurst – that experienced high population growth between the 1990 and 2000 census. An undercount of this magnitude results in a wide gap between community needs and city funding for key initiatives such as affordable housing and transportation – calling into question the accuracy and practicality of the decennial census.

The American Community Survey – an annual supplement to the decennial census – captures vital information cities such as New York need in order to determine long-term planning and financial decisions.  Think of it as a yearly physical for the government – a check-up for how well it is serving the American population.  Information obtained through ACS correlates with the long-form survey on the decennial census; yet because it is administered yearly, changes in housing characteristics and demographics are more easily traced than by simply referencing the decennial census.

Wall3Edit2. American Community Survey housing demographic information. Source: NYC Citizens Housing and Planning Council, “2012 American Community Survey, using CHPC’s Making Room Housing Model” (2012)

For Uneven Growth, SITU worked with the CHPC to visualize data from the American Community Survey with respect to housing demographics. The above diagram shows the 13 neighborhoods in New York City with the highest rates of shared spaces per 2012 ACS data. When superimposed on the map to show locations of reported illegal conversions (in blue) a correlation can be seen between concentrations of informal housing and shared living conditions. Citywide, only 17.65% of housing units are occupied by what the Census Bureau considers “nuclear families.”  However the City’s housing stock consists largely of 2-3 bedroom apartments with a “master bedroom.” This disconnect between demographics and existing typologies provided an important starting point for our exhibition research. Overall, the percentage of singles living alone is 31.4% and the percentage of housing units that are shared either with or without family members is 25.4%. Given these trends, SITU focused on strategies dedicated to realigning living space and demographics realities by focusing on the needs of individuals living alone as well shared housing arrangements.  In this sense, The Other New York focuses on a model of incremental growth and flexibility in the type of housing stock as a direct response to the shifting demographic trends within neighborhoods expressed in the American Community Survey.