SITU Studio was invited by the Brooklyn Museum to participate in this year’s Brooklyn Artists Ball. Now in its fifth year, the event honored outgoing Museum Director Arnold Lehman as well as artists Takashi Murakami, Kiki Smith and Jean-Michel Basquiat, as represented by his family, all of whom have made a lasting and profound impact on the Brooklyn cultural community specifically and New York as a whole. SITU was one of eight practices – all of whom are Brooklyn based – invited to design and install environments and tablescapes for the one-night-only event. On April 15th the Museum’s Glass Pavilion, Lobby and Beaux Arts Court, were transformed into an immersive experience replete with models donning crocheted garments to large papier-mâché iterations of food dangling from the center of the court space creating an overall environment that was as much a visual feast as fête.

Tasked with the challenge of producing a dynamic intervention in the Glass Pavilion, SITU welcomed the invitation as an opportunity to experiment with a fabric installation. SITU worked with a variety of industrial and construction grade nets often used to protect sites from falling debris and ultimately settled on shade netting found in agricultural applications. The material, a woven aluminum screen typically stretched horizontally, in this instance is instead hung vertically. Functioning as a progression of light-filtering layers, the installation both reflected and transmitted event lighting choreographed by Ken Lapham in dynamic and playful ways.

 Timelapse of SITU’s installation IllumiNetting in the Glass Pavilion.
IllumiNetting’s light-filtering layers capture the festive mood in the Dance Party space. Photo by Keith Sirchio

From street artists to set designers and everything in between the Artists Ball featured works by Duke Riley, Faile, Fernando Mastrangelo, Jen Catron & Paul Outlaw, Olek, Dustin Yellin and Pioneer Works inviting the 750 guests to dine among battleships (Riley), crocheted tablecloths, (Olek) cheese wedges and turkey legs (Catron & Outlaw) to name just a few. Guests at Faile’s table, the work of artists Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller, donned sunglasses to protect their eyes from the bright lights of the designers’ massive illuminated comic strip table.

Crocheted artist Olek’s tablescape draws inspiration from the work of honorees, Murakami, Smith and Basquiat.
Photo by Liz Ligon courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum
photo (9) Jen Catron and Paul Outlaw – perched high above guests – enlivened the dinner with their over-sized food.
FAILE-Table-Photo-Credit-Elena-Oliva

A night to celebrate Arnold Lehman and everything he has contributed to the Brooklyn Museum, the Borough and far beyond, it was a special evening and a snapshot of the impact he has made over his seventeen years as Director.

Recent press about the event can be found here:
Artnews

Forbes

Town and Country